Children Regulate Emotions through Conscious Discipline

 
Pillows and books are used in a Safe Place, where students can practice regulating their emotions.

Pillows and books are used in a Safe Place, where students can practice regulating their emotions.

 


Discipline is not something we do to children, but something we develop within them.
— Dr. Becky Bailey

Parenting can be both rewarding and overwhelming.

It is inevitable that a parent will experience their child misbehaving, throwing tantrums or simply causing mischief as the child learns to regulate their emotions and impulses.

Finding a healthy way to discipline a child while also allowing them to explore their interpersonal world requires patience and compassion. But it also requires parents to be clear about the values and boundaries they are responsible for cultivating in their child.

 While we do not specialize in behavior problems, our teachers address common behavior patterns through a technique called Conscious Discipline, which transforms difficult behaviors into teachable moments.  

 Conscious Discipline develops discipline within children rather than applying discipline to them. These moments are opportunities to teach children the social-emotional and communication skills that will carry them through adulthood.

 Cindy Metz, director of curriculum (infants-PreK), said staffers have found the method easy to learn and use.. UCP’s East Orange Campus at Bailes Early Childhood Academy also uses pictures that show walk and stop for those that relate better to visuals. 

The seven basic skills of Conscious Discipline,, developed by Dr. Becky Bailey, help both children and adults manage themselves, resolve conflict, prevent bullying and develop pro-social behaviors. It is based on current brain research, child development data and developmentally appropriate best practices.

Bailey sums up the basis of the program as: “Discipline is not something we do to children, but something we develop within them.”

Lisa Dunham, a teacher at East Orange Charter School, said she discovered Bailey’s Conscious Discipline techniques when she became a parent. 

“I look at Conscious Discipline like any other relationship I have in my life,” said the second/third grade teacher. “When you form relationships, you know what brings people joy. I ask about extracurricular activities. I notice my students and point out positive behavior. I send positive messages to parents about what I see their children do at school. I treat students the way I want to be treated, with respect and understanding. 

 Here are the seven basic skills:

Composure

Encouragement

Assertiveness

Choices

Empathy

Positive Intent

Consequences

To learn more about Conscious Discipline, go to: www.consciousdiscipline.com

If your child is experiencing significant behavior challenges please visit https://www.breakthroughbehavior.com/

If your child is on the autism spectrum and requires a more specialized environment visit

https://www.princeton-house.org/

http://accesscharterschool.org/